Works – Future Fantasy

1871, J.W.M. , The Coming Cromwell

J.W.M. (1871) The Coming Cromwell. Set in a Near Future Britain in which the eponymous military and political leader conquers the monarchist northlands of Britain on behalf of the republican south, overturning the German monarchy as well en passant. [SFE] ...
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1872, Octogenarian , The British Federal Empire in the 20th Century

Octogenarian (1872) The British Federal Empire; how it was Founded. A Speech Delivered in a Certain Year of the Twentieth Century, in a Certain City of the Empire, London: C. H. Clarke Fife Herald - Thursday 20 June 1872: The British Federal Empire in the 20th Century. Octogenarian. London: C. H. ClarkeThis oracular sketch of what the British Empire will be when all its divisions are to be united to England and to each other the federal ties which Isaac Butt demands for Ireland. The reasoning employed to show that such ties are the most natural, proper, and safe, is ...
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1881, Lang-Tung , The Decline and Fall of the British Empire 

Lang-Tung (Pseudonym) (1881) The Decline and Fall of the British Empire: Being a History of England Between the Years 1840-1981: Written for the Use of Junior Classes in Schools Two satires on imperial inefficiency and the excesses of the Gilded Age take the long view of history, within which both Britain and the USA have disappeared into obscurity. The Decline and Fall of the British Empire (1881) ironically reduces Gibbon's grand history to a pamphlet designed for use in junior schools. Its simple question-and-answer sequence infanfilizes the projected reader, the whole work being presented as a primer, translated from the ...
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1893, Fawcett, E. D. , Hartmann The Anarchist 

E. Douglas Fawcett (1893) Hartmann The Anarchist, London, Edward Arnold. Illustrated by F.T. Jane. The plot centers around Mr Stanley, a young moneyed gentleman who aims to stand for election as part of the Labour party in the early 20th century. Through his associations with many of London's most prominent socialists and anarchists, he encounters and befriends Rudolph Hartmann and 'goes along' with Hartmann's plan to attack London using his airship The Attila. [Wikipedia] Hartmann the Anarchist, originally published in 1892, was written by Edward Douglas Fawcett when he was 17 years old. After being out of print for 100 ...
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1893, Griffith, G. , The Angel of the Revolution 

George Griffith (1893) The Angel of the Revolution: A Tale of the Coming Terror, London, Tower Publishing Company The Angel of the Revolution: A Tale of the Coming Terror (1893) is a science fiction novel by English writer George Griffith. It was his first published novel and remains his most famous work. It was first published in Pearson's Weekly and was prompted by the success of The Great War of 1892 in Black and White magazine, which was itself inspired by The Battle of Dorking. A lurid mix of Jules Verne's futuristic air warfare fantasies, the utopian visions of News ...
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1894, Griffith, G. , Olga Romanoff / The Syren of the Skies 

George Griffith (1894) Olga Romanoff / The Syren of the Skies first published as Pearson's Weekly. The novel continues (from The Angel of the Revolution) the tale of a worldwide brotherhood of anarchists fighting the world armed with fantastical airships, ending on an apocalyptic note as a comet smashes into the earth. Full text at: http://www.forgottenfutures.com/game/ff7/olga.htm ...
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1895, Ellis, T.M. , Zalma 

T. Mullet Ellis (1895) Zalma The eponymous female villain in Zalma (1895) by T Mullett Ellis seeks to continue her father’s efforts to destroy the nobility of Europe and plans to release balloons laden with anthrax over the capital cities, but is thankfully thwarted before she can carry out her plan. [Mike Ashley, The Fear of Invasion, British Library, http://www.bl.uk/romantics-and-victorians/articles/the-fear-of-invasion] Following quickly on the heels of Olga Romanoff, and overtly referencing The Angel of the Revolution, was T. Mullett Ellis' Zalma (1895), in which Zalma von der Pahlen, daughter of the leader of the international nihilist and anarchist movements and, ...
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1895, Griffith, G. , The Outlaws of the Air 

George Griffith (1895) The Outlaws of the Air, London, Tower Publishing   [Serialised in Short Stories in September 1894 - May 1895] With that he sent the Vengeur across the Embankment and the Strand, and placed her over the Law Courts. Then bomb after bomb crashed in quick succession through different parts of the gabled roof of the great building, until it was on fire in a dozen places at once, and there was such a stampede and haste to get out as the law's delay had never known before. That afternoon and evening neither flag was hoisted nor light kindled ...
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1895, Lermina, J. , La Bataille de Strasbourg 

Jules Lermina (1895) La Bataille de Strasbourg [The Battle of Strasbourg]  An early novel on the theme of the "yellow peril". Set in the 1920s, though written in the 1890s, Jules Lermina's The Battle of Strasbourg is credited by historians of futuristic fiction with launching the literary genre known as "yellow peril" fiction. It is also one of the first "immersive fantasies" to be completely set in the future and the earliest to do so straightforwardly. From Paris to Peking, from Persia to St. Petersburg, the Chinese armies are marching toward Europe, moved by their deep resentment against the West ...
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1909, Doughty, C.M. , The Cliffs and (1912) The Clouds 

Charles M. Doughty (1909) The Cliffs and (1912) The Clouds His book-length poems are all fantastic in nature, and two of them are of some sf interest as perhaps the most arcane Future War tales ever told: The Cliffs (1909) features an airborne "Persanian" invasion of England, which is successfully repelled; in The Clouds (1912) a similar invasion is successful, and England occupied. Both poems are designed as warnings to complacent Britons, though it is hard to think that more than a few hundred readers ever came to terms with Doughty's deeply eccentric though formidable style. [SFE] Full text (The ...
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1910, London, J. , The Unparalleled Invasion 

Jack London (1910) The Unparalleled Invasion Under the influence of Japan, China modernizes and undergoes its own version of the Meiji Reforms in the 1910s. In 1922, China breaks away from Japan and fights a brief war that culminates in the Chinese annexation of the Japanese possessions of Korea, Formosa, and Manchuria. Over the next half century, China's population steadily grows, and eventually migration overwhelms European colonies in Asia. The United States and the other Western powers launch a biological warfare campaign against China, resulting in the destruction of China's population, the few survivors of the plague being killed out ...
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1911, Muddersnook , When the New Zealander Comes 

Prof. Blyde Muddersnook P.O.Z.A.S. (1911) When the New Zealander Comes. Strand Magazine September 1911 A bit out of scope but an interesting story about a group of tourists from the far future visiting the ancient ruins of London in a manner reminiscent of Edwardian visitors to Greek and Roman archeological sites. I was enchanted by the description of Southwark (then known as 'Suthuk') most of which "is now reclaimed land planted with cabbages" ...
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1911, Rupert, G.G., The Yellow Peril

G.G. Rupert (1911) The Yellow Peril Rupert was influential in the development of the idea of the Yellow Peril, the theory that East Asians (the "yellow races") were a present and future threat to the west. These views were published in The Yellow Peril, or the Orient vs. the Occident as viewed by modern statesmen and ancient prophets (1911). Rupert included Russia among the "oriental" races, which, he believed, would eventually invade America. According to Rupert the reference to "the kings from the East" in the Book of Revelation 16:12, was a prediction of this event. He believed that Russia ...
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