Works – Espionage

1898, Phillips Oppenheim, E. , The Mysterious Mr Sabin 

E. Phillips Oppenheim (1898) The Mysterious Mr Sabin It was largely the success of his first spy novel, Mysterious Mr. Sabin (1898), that enabled Oppenheim to relinquish control over the family business and devote himself to a full-time writing career. "The first of my long stories dealing with that shadowy and mysterious world of diplomacy," wrote Oppenheim in his memoirs, the novel revolves around a plot to overthrow the Third French Republic. Its central figure, Monsieur Sabin, is none other than the Duc de Souspennier, a royalist nurturing ambitions of being a new Richelieu. The stratagem he devises for ridding ...
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1899, Hill, H. , The Spies of the Wight 

Headon Hill [Francis Edward Grainger] (1899) The Spies of the Wight.  London, C. Arthur Pearson A year later [1899] Headon Hill used this formula in The Spies of the Wight, the first full-length account of German agents at work in the United Kingdom and an early indication that Germany had taken the place of France as the enemy in tomorrow's war. The notorious Kruger telegram of 3 January 1896 was read as a hostile act against the United Kingdom; and the new German fleet, sanctioned by the -Navy Law of April 1898, suggested to many that the two nations had ...
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1900, Kipling, R. , Kim 

Rudyard Kipling (1900) Kim - McClure's Magazine (December 1900 to October 1901), Cassell's Magazine (January to November 1901) & Macmillan & Co. Ltd (October 1901) Although not in the mainstream Invasion Scare / Espionage genre Kim deserves a place as a prototypical spy story linked in to British imperial attitudes. The story unfolds against the backdrop of The Great Game, the political conflict between Russia and Britain in Central Asia. It is set after the Second Afghan War which ended in 1881, but before the Third, probably in the period 1893 to 1898 .... After three years of schooling, Kim ...
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1905, Mill, G. , In the hands of the Czar, 

Garrett Mill (1905) In the hands of the Czar, Blackwood To the unsophisticated person who knows nothing of the mysteries of the diplomatic service, the ways and manners of the various diplomats who take a hand in the game as it is played in Jn the Hands of the Czar seem stagey and too ineptly mysterious. Four of them arrive in succession at a hotel On the borders of Switzerland ; three are interested in the signing of some vague document that is to bring about an alliance between Germany, France and Russia, and the fourth, the English secret agent, ...
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1905, Phillips Oppenheim, E. , A Maker of History 

E. Phillips Oppenheim (1905) A Maker of History "Not as you and I understand it, perhaps," Spencer explained. "There is no Scotland Yard extending a protecting arm over the place, and that sort of thing. But the place is haunted by spies, and there are intrigues carried on there in which the secret service police often take a hand. In return it is generally very hard to get to the bottom of any disappearance or even robbery there through the usual channels. To the casual visitor, and of course it attracts thousands from its reputation, it presents no more dangers ...
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1907, Conrad, J. , The Secret Agent 

Joseph Conrad (1907) The Secret Agent The Secret Agent: A Simple Tale is a novel by Joseph Conrad published in 1907. The story is set in London in 1886 and deals largely with the life of Mr. Verloc and his job as a spy. The Secret Agent is also notable as it is one of Conrad's later political novels, which move away from his typical tales of seafaring. The novel deals broadly with the notions of anarchism, espionage, and terrorism. It portrays anarchist or revolutionary groups before many of the social uprisings of the twentieth century. However, it also deals ...
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1907, Phillips Oppenheim, E. , The Great Secret 

Oppenheim, E. Phillips (1907) The Great Secret (aka. The Secret) "Diplomacy demanded a victim," he said, "and I never flinched. Two men knew the truth, and they are dead. My scheme was a bold one. If it had succeeded, it would have meant an alliance with Germany, an absolute incontrovertible alliance and an imperishable peace. France and Russia would have been powerless—the balance of strength, of accessible strength, must always have been with us. Every German statesman of note was with me. The falsehood, the vilely egotistic ambition of one man, chock-full to the lips with personal jealousy, a madman ...
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1909, Le Queux, W. , Spies of the Kaiser 

William Le Queux (1909) Spies of the Kaiser. Plotting the Downfall of England Spies of the Kaiser  was published in 1909, and raised spymania to new extremes. Again, Le Queux’s fantasies had their popularity massively boosted by the  Daily Mail’s hype machine. And again the story was presented as non-fiction. [Graeme Shimmin, Le Queux: How One Crazy Spy Novelist Created MI5 and MI6] Still, as fanned by Le Queux, Lord Roberts and the press, British suspicions of Germany reached its high-water mark upon publication of Spies of the Kaiser. Teeming with authentic and, if not evidence, at least well researched ...
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1911, Phillips Oppenheim, E. , The Double Four 

Phillips Oppenheim, E. (1911) The Double Four, London, (aka. Peter Ruff and the Double Four,  Boston, Little, Brown and company, 1912) The Peter Ruff stories were printed between October 1909 and October 1911 in Pearson's Magazine (US). Really a series of detective, adventure stories but they doinclude an encounter with a German spy. Full text at: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/28091/28091-h/28091-h.htm and https://archive.org/details/peterruffanddou00unkngoog ...
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1914, Graves, A.K. , The Secrets of the German War Office 

Dr. Armgaard Karl Graves (1914) The Secrets of the German War Office Purported to be a true story it reads more like an imaginative attempt to capitalise upon spy fever.  [see contemporary review] The average man or woman has only a hazy idea what European Secret Service and Espionage really means and accomplishes. Short stories and novels, written in a background of diplomacy and secret agents, have given the public vague impressions about the world of spies. But this is the first real unvarnished account of the system; the class of men and women employed; the means used to obtain ...
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