Torpedo Warfare

1871 , Chesney, G. T. , The Battle of Dorking 

George Tomkyns Chesney (1871) The Battle of Dorking, Blackwood’s Magazine For many, this is the work that is regarded as the start of Invasion Literature as a distinct genre. DURING THE EVENING OF 2 September 1871, the British Prime Minister spoke to the Working Men's Liberal Association at Whitby in Yorkshire. Towards the end of his speech he warned his audience and the nation against the dangers of alarmism. It was an unusual occasion in British political history, since Gladstone was attacking a short story that had appeared four months earlier in the May issue of Blackwood's Magazine. It was ...
Read More

1871, Anonymous , Der Ruhm or The Wreck of German Unity 

Anonymous (1871) Der Ruhm or The Wreck of German Unity - The Narrative of a Brandenburger Haupmann - Macmillan's Magazine A counter to The Battle of Dorking ...
Read More

1871, Payn, J. , The Cruise of the Anti-Torpedo 

James Payn (1871) The Cruise of the Anti-Torpedo, Chambers Journal [Being an account of the voyage of the last ship left to England after its conquest by Bismark & Co. (Limited) ; what she did, and what she omitted to do; and how she finally succeeded single-handed (as a pawn regains a queen), in restoring the fallen fortunes of our beloved country.] One of the many post-Battle of Dorking stories. THE CRUISE OF THE ANTI-TORPEDO. IN THREE CHAPTERS.—CHAPTER 1. 'Go on ahead!' cried our gallant captain. 'Go on ahead !' reiterated the call-boy in his shrill treble; and that noble ...
Read More

1877, Anonymous , Fifty Years Hence – An Old Soldiers Tale of England’s Downfall 

Anonymous (1877) Fifty Years Hence - An Old Soldiers Tale of England's Downfall, London, G.W. Bacon & Co. A soldier's reminiscences from 1927. Britain gets dragged into a conflict between Russia and Turkey on the Turkish side. Austria, our only ally, is pressured by Germany to stand aside and the British declare war on Russia when the Suez canal is blocked and Alexandria bombarded. Germany aligns with Russia. Our fleet suffers eventual defeat and a weakened Britain cannot prevent an uprising in India that quickly frees it from British rule. Britain is forced to accept punitive peace terms. IT was ...
Read More

1877, Walker, W.H. , The Invasion 

W. H. Walker (1877) The Invasion An account of an imaginary invasion of Australia by a Russian fleet. WE had lived such a hum-drum life at Parkestown for long, that when on the morning of the 18th May, 187—, the Herald was not delivered as usual, I almost felt as if the Solar System had gone out of gear. Reflection showed me that the irregularity might be accounted for by some minor cause, but when ten o'clock came, and brought, instead of the paper, an appalling rumour, through our butter and pumpkin merchant, I thought that I might as well ...
Read More

1882, Berney, T. , The battle of the channel tunnel and Dover Castle and forts 

Rev. Thomas Berney (1882) The battle of the channel tunnel and Dover Castle and forts : a letter (March 11th, 1882, but with some corrections and modifications) to the Right Honourable Wm. Ewart Gladstone, M.P., First Lord of the Treasury Sir, I beg leave with great respect to address you upon a subject which has long been a source of the greatest anxiety to me, and to which I am most thankful to see that you have given your recent attention in the appointing of a Scientific Committee ; and then, I learn, of a Committee on the question of ...
Read More

1883, Robida, A. , La Guerre au Vingtième Siècle 

Albert Robida (1883) La Guerre au Vingtième Siècle A fantastical view of warfare in the 20C from the French illustrator Robida involving aircraft, tanks, chemical and biological weapons. Robida is said to have shown a penchant for satire even in his youth; by 1873, he had founded his own satirical journal, La Caricature. A decade later, he published the first of a trilogy of satirical, futuristic novels, The Twentieth Century (Le Vingtieme siecle), which portrayed everyday life in 1950s France. That book would be followed in 1887 by War in the Twentieth Century (La Guerre au Vingtieme siecle), and in ...
Read More

1885, Posteritas , The Siege of London 

Posteritas (1885) The Siege of London, London, Wyman & Sons CHAPTER 1. ENGLAND's POLITICAL MISTAKES. —THE EGYPTIAN MUDDLE.— ALARMING SIGNS IN THE FOREIGN POLITICAL SKY. It is not our purpose here to enter fully into the series of extraordinary events which led up to the gigantic disaster, whereby the English nation was crushed into the dust, and the power and might of England all but utterly destroyed. A brief recapitulation is, however, necessary, In order that the reader may be able to fully comprehend the nature of the stupendous changes that were wrought in an astonishingly brief period. The events ...
Read More

1887, Anonymous , The Battle off Worthing: why the Invaders never got to Dorking 

Anonymous (1887) The Battle off Worthing: why the Invaders never got to Dorking As an example of how other writers picked over the dry bones of the Dorking a ninety-six page novella by an anonymous "Captain of the Royal Navy," titled The Battle Off Worthing: Why the Invaders Never Got To Dorking (1887), may be worth a brief summary. In his introduction the writer recalls how Chesney's fable, while condemned by the press as visionary and improbable, nevertheless had instilled in the populace '"a latent feeling of insecurity." It was that pamphlet which "first stirred the national pulse. Everybody read ...
Read More

1887, Clowes, W.L. , The Great Naval War of 1887 

William Laird Clowes (1887) The Great Naval War of 1887 Originally published anonymously. Attributed also to Alan Hughes Burgoyne [Charles Gannon (2003) Rumors of War, p.11]. A Future War novel about the coming naval war between Great Britain and France. THE GREAT NAVAL WAR OF 1887.  (St. James's Gazette.) I.-THE DISASTER AT SPITHEAD. At the beginning of March, 1887, the various difficulties which in the course of the previous four or five years had arisen between Great Britain and France were as far as they had ever been from a settlement. A British garrison still remained in Egypt, a French ...
Read More

1888, Anonymous , The Russia’s Hope 

Anonymous (1888) The Russia's Hope: Or Britannia No Longer Rules the Waves; Showing How the Muscovite Bear Got at the British Whale translated by Charles James Cooke with a preface by William Beatty-Kingston, London, Chapman and Hall Preface: FEW Englishmen, in all probability, realise how fervently the great nation to which they are proud to belong is envied and detested by another mighty nation, with which it is by no means impossible that they may be brought into violent collision before the close of the current century, if not earlier. We are not, as a rule, addicted to self-introspection, and ...
Read More

1888, Arnold-Forster, H.O. , In a Conning Tower 

Hugh Oakeley Arnold-Forster (1888) In a Conning Tower; or, How I Took H.M.S. "Majestic" into Action. A Story of Modern Ironclad Warfare, Murray's Magazine Hugh Oakeley Arnold-Forster (1855 – 1909), was a British politician and writer. He notably served as Secretary of State for War from 1903 to 1905. From boyhood he had devoted himself to the close study of naval affairs and of warships. His love of the sea was insatiable, and he spent many a holiday cruising in a Thames barge, which he fitted out in quite homely fashion. In 1884 he inspired the famous articles on ' ...
Read More
Loading...