Spy Fiction

Andrew, C. (2009) The Defence of the Realm: The Authorized History of MI5

Christopher Andrew, (2009) The Defence of the Realm: The Authorized History of MI5. Allen Lane Contains an extensive background to the founding of MI5 / SIS and the role of spy and invasion literature. To mark the centenary of its foundation, the British Security Service, MI5, has opened its archives to an independent historian. The Defence of the Realm, the book which results, is an unprecedented publication. It reveals the precise role of the Service in twentieth-century British history, from its foundation by Captain Kell of the British Army in October 1909 to root out 'the spies of the Kaiser' ...
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Atkins, J. (1984) The British Spy Novel

John Atkins (1984) The British Spy Novel, London, John Calder Fiction about spies and spying – a genre of which British writers have generally been the most successful exponents – is a phenomenon which truly began in the twentieth century. Although Dickens’s A Tale of Two Cities could qualify as spy fiction, it is really with The Riddle of the Sands by Erskine Childers that the genre really begins. Since then it has been dominated by writers of varying quality such as John Buchan, Ian Fleming, John Le Carré and Len Deighton.In this gripping account, John Atkins examines the subject ...
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Bibliography – Espionage

Andrew, Christopher M., The Defence of the Realm : The Authorized History of Mi5, London: Allen Lane, 2009. Blum, Howard, Dark Invasion : 1915: Germany's Secret War and the Hunt for the First Terrorist Cell in America, Melbourne: Scribe, 2014. Hampshire, James, ''Spy Fever' in Britain, 1900 to 1914', Historian. Hiley, Nicholas, 'The Failure of British Counter-Espionage against Germany, 1907-1914', Historical Journal, Vol. 28, No. 4 (1985): 835-862. Hiley, Nicholas, 'Spying for the Kaiser', History Today, No. 6 (1988): 37. Hiley, Nicholas, 'Entering the Lists: Mi5's Great Spy Round-up of August 1914', Intelligence & National Security, Vol. 21, No. 1 ...
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Denning, M. (1987) Cover Stories: Narrative and Ideology in the British Spy Thriller

Michael Denning (1987) Cover Stories: Narrative and Ideology in the British Spy Thriller, London, Routledge & Kegan Paul It is a habit in all of us to make our cover stories, our assumed personae, at least parallel with the reality .. , We should take the opposition's cover stories more seriously The more identities a man has, the more they express the person they conceal Few men can resist expressing their appetites when they are making a fantasy about themselves. - George Smiley in John Le Carré's Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy (1974) Since the turn of the century, spy thrillers ...
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Morton, J. (2010) Spies of the First World War – Under Cover for King and Kaiser

James Morton (2010) Spies of the First World War - Under Cover for King and Kaiser, Kew, The National Archives When Colonel James Edmonds argued for a British secret service in 1907, officials mocked that he had ̀espionage on the brain'. But fracturing European relations and the resulting explosion in spy activity were to prove Edmonds' prescience. By the time of the First World War undercover agents operated in cities from Geneva to Paris, New York to Moscow, and German spies were being shot in the Tower of London. Spies of the First World War balances accessible history of a ...
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Panek, LeRoy L. (1981) Special Branch : the British Spy Novel, 1890-1980

LeRoy L. Panek (1981) Special Branch : the British Spy Novel, 1890-1980 The author has chosen seventeen of the most important or representative British spy novelists to write about. He presents some basic literary analysis and criticism, trying both to place them in historical perspective and to describe and analyze the content and form of their fiction. Unfortunately he seems to miss the point sometimes - e.g. describing The Riddle of the Sands as containing overlong and detailed descriptions of sailing that must be tedious even to keen sailors. He doesn't seem to understand that one of the reasons The ...
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Spy Fever: The Post Office Affair

Margaret Tait Flaws, Spy Fever: The Post Office Affair, Shetland Times Ltd (14 Mar. 2009) At the beginning of the First World War, stories of spies abounded throughout the British Isles. It was in this atmosphere that the entire staff of the Lerwick Post Office was marched off to prison and incarcerated for almost a week with no explanation from the authorities. One of those imprisoned was Margaret Flaws' grandfather and for the last few years the author has been researching the events which led up to the incident. Combining this research with details of how the event affected individual ...
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Spy Fiction as a Genre

Spy fiction can be seen as a genre in its own right but it also intersects with Invasion and Future War literature especially in the late 19c / early 20C. A good introduction is available at: Encyclopedia of Espionage, Intelligence, and Security at http://www.faqs.org/espionage/In-Int/Intelligence-Literature.html How fiction related to the real world is well covered by Le Queux: How One Crazy Spy Novelist Created MI5 and MI6 by Graeme Shimmin at: http://graemeshimmin.com/william-le-queux-andbritish-spying/ Le Queux, E. Phillips Oppenheim and Erskine Childers novels are discussed in LeRoy L. Panek's (1981) Special Branch : the British Spy Novel, 1890-1980 The BFI has a good ...
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Stafford, D. (2013), The Silent Game: The Real World of Imaginary Spies

Stafford, D. (2013) The Silent Game: The Real World of Imaginary Spies, Thistle Publishing The Silent Game traces the history of spy writers and their fiction from creator William Le Queux, of the Edwardian age, to John le Carré, of the Cold War era. David Stafford reveals the connections between fact and fiction as seen in the lives of writers with experience in intelligence, including John Buchan, Compton Mackenzie, Somerset Maugham, Ian Fleming, and Graham Greene. Le Queux used his spy fiction as xenophobic propaganda before and after World War I, and le Carré’s novels have provided reflections on the ...
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Wade, S. (2009) Victoria’s Spymasters: Empire and Espionage

Stephen Wade (2009) Victoria's Spymasters - Empire and Espionage, Stroud, The History Press Covering the lives and achievements of five English intelligence officers involved in wars at home and abroad between 1870 and 1918, this exceptionally researched book offers an insight into spying in the age of Victoria. Including material from little-known sources such as memoirs, old biographies and information from M15 and the police history archives, this book is a more detailed sequel to Wade's earlier work, Spies in the Empire. The book examines the social and political context of Victorian spying and the role of intelligence in the ...
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Wark, W.K. (1991) Spy Fiction, Spy Films and Real Intelligence

Wesley K. Wark (1991) Spy Fiction, Spy Films and Real Intelligence This book won the Canadian Crime Writers' Arthur Ellis Award for the Best Genre Criticism/Reference book of 1991. This collection of essays is an attempt to explore the history of spy fiction and spy films and investigate the significance of the ideas they contain. The volume offers new insights into the development and symbolism of British spy fiction. Contents: Introduction - Fictions of history, Wesley K. Wark.Secret negotiations - the spy figure in 19th century American popular fiction, Christine Bold.The politics of adventure in the early British spy novel, ...
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Woods B. F. (2007), Neutral Ground: A Political History Of Espionage Fiction

Woods B. F. (2007) Neutral Ground: A Political History Of Espionage Fiction, Algora Publishing Espionage fiction is one of the most popular forms of entertainment in the literate world and, since its widespread acceptance in the early twentieth century, it has sought to pursue the secret politics of Western social order. Drawn from reality, exposing what is generally concealed, it provides a unique glimpse into the darker, more conspiratorial affairs of state through the use of fictional covert actions, double agents, treason, and international intrigues. It is a carefully crafted, clandestine venue wherein the situations are circumscribed, the moods are ...
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