Literary Works

Works here are listed chronologically. To see a list by author see Stories by Author.


1894, Mayo, Earl of , The War Cruise of the Aries 

The Earl of Mayo (1894) The War Cruise of the Aries, Illustrated by William Boulton, Dublin, Edward Ponsonby CHAPTER 1. HISTORY OF THE WAR. In 18__  England was at war with France; and before coming to the history of the cruise of the 'Aries,' it is proposed to recount, as briefly as possible, the events which led to that short, but terrible struggle. It was a well-known fact that France was intriguing with the ruler of Egypt against England. A plot was discovered; the conspirators had arranged a general rising; an attempt to fire the barracks occupied by the British ...
Read More

1895, Eastwick, J. , The New Centurion 

Eastwick, J. (1895) The New Centurion - A Tale of Automatic War, London, Longmans, Green and Co. TO THE READER Many years ago the writer of these pages first conceived the idea that, as the heavy guns of a modern ironclad were, and must ever be, her decisive weapons, the chief thing to be attended to was to increase their rate and precision of fire, und that the power requisite for this purpose could readily and economically be obtained from the guns' recoil. Further, it occurred to him that this might enable the crew to be withdrawn from the vicinity ...
Read More

1895, Edwards, H. , Britain in Arms 

Hamilton Edwards (1895) Britain in Arms, published in the story paper Pluck and in 1897 in Boys' Friend. For British boys, the First World War started, not in 1914 but in 1895 when, according to the Hamilton Edwards serial, "Britain in Arms," published in the story paper Pluck, a coalition of Continental powers, envious of empire, attempted to invade the British Isles. Despite some tense moments, the Royal Navy eventually succeeds in destroying the enemy fleet, while the British army under the command of the nation's most popular soldier, Lord Roberts of Khandahar, invades the Continent and deals the aggressors ...
Read More

1895, Ellis, T.M. , Zalma 

T. Mullet Ellis (1895) Zalma The eponymous female villain in Zalma (1895) by T Mullett Ellis seeks to continue her father’s efforts to destroy the nobility of Europe and plans to release balloons laden with anthrax over the capital cities, but is thankfully thwarted before she can carry out her plan. [Mike Ashley, The Fear of Invasion, British Library, http://www.bl.uk/romantics-and-victorians/articles/the-fear-of-invasion] Following quickly on the heels of Olga Romanoff, and overtly referencing The Angel of the Revolution, was T. Mullett Ellis' Zalma (1895), in which Zalma von der Pahlen, daughter of the leader of the international nihilist and anarchist movements and, ...
Read More

1895, Griffith, G. , The Outlaws of the Air 

George Griffith (1895) The Outlaws of the Air, London, Tower Publishing   [Serialised in Short Stories in September 1894 - May 1895] With that he sent the Vengeur across the Embankment and the Strand, and placed her over the Law Courts. Then bomb after bomb crashed in quick succession through different parts of the gabled roof of the great building, until it was on fire in a dozen places at once, and there was such a stampede and haste to get out as the law's delay had never known before. That afternoon and evening neither flag was hoisted nor light kindled ...
Read More

1895, Jane, F.T. ,  Blake of the “Rattlesake” 

Fred T. Jane (1895), Blake of the "Rattlesake" or The Man Who Saved England - A story of Torpedo Warfare in 189- , London, Tower Publishing Co Ltd Preface: I have not sought or attempted in this story to settle any vexed questions of theories or tactics; such matters are no concern of mine. I have tried instead to work into story-form some of the romance that clings thick around the torpedo service, to set forth some of the poetry latent in torpedo oraft. Any other aims I may have had in view are, I trust, sufficiently obvious in the ...
Read More

1895, Lermina, J. , La Bataille de Strasbourg 

Jules Lermina (1895) La Bataille de Strasbourg [The Battle of Strasbourg]  An early novel on the theme of the "yellow peril". Set in the 1920s, though written in the 1890s, Jules Lermina's The Battle of Strasbourg is credited by historians of futuristic fiction with launching the literary genre known as "yellow peril" fiction. It is also one of the first "immersive fantasies" to be completely set in the future and the earliest to do so straightforwardly. From Paris to Peking, from Persia to St. Petersburg, the Chinese armies are marching toward Europe, moved by their deep resentment against the West ...
Read More

1895, Loir, M. , Naval Battles of the Future 

Maurice Loir (1895) Naval Battles of the Future Maurice Loir's (1895) Naval Battles of the Future takes the form of a series of journal entries by a perceptive and philosophical naval officer aboard a French vessel engaged in dreadnought warfare in the Mediterranean. It is a sobering reflection on patriotism, solidarity, and ambition, and a reminder of the human element in war-future, final, or otherwise. [Publisher's Description of English translation by Brian Stableford (2014) Naval Battles of the Future in The Final War ] ...
Read More

1896, Anson, C.V. , The Great Anglo-American War of 1900 

Captain Charles Vernon Anson, R.N. (1896) The Great Anglo-American War of 1900 Needs research - Britain defeated by the USA. From SFE: C.V. Anson (1846-1905) UK writer, in the Royal Navy 1859-1896. His Future War tale, The Great Anglo-American War of 1900 (1896), warrants modest interest for the worldwide scope of the conflict and for the UK's destruction of San Francisco, which inspires an inventive American response and the surrender of Canada. For verisimilitude, the tale should perhaps have been set several years further into the future. [http://www.sf-encyclopedia.com/entry/anson_captain] From www.findagrave.com: Royal Navy Captain, (1846-1905) Commander Coast Guard Station at Ramsgate ...
Read More

1896, Burton, F. G. ,  The Naval Engineer And The Command Of The Sea 

Francis G. Burton (1896), The Naval Engineer And The Command Of The Sea: A Story Of Naval Administration, Manchester, The Technical Publishing Company Ltd PREFACE We are so accustomed to think ourselves invincible at sea, if not on land; we glory so much in recollection of the victories of Hawkins, Drake, Rodney, Howe, Jarvis, Duncan, and Nelson; we are so proud of our majestic battleships and their unequalled crews, that we are apt to overlook the great change which has resulted from the introduction of steam as a motive power. We have, in the evolution of naval architecture, abandoned our ...
Read More

1896, Cromie, R. , The Next Crusade 

Robert Cromie (1896) The Next Crusade, London, Hutchinson & Co. A follow up to For England's Sake. Britain and Austria, with Germany's help, defeat the Russians and Turks ...
Read More

1896, Tracy, L. , The Final War 

1896, Tracy, L. , The Final War Louis Tracy (1896) The Final War THE BALL AT THE EMBASSY The month of May in Paris, if the elements be reasonably propitious, is a perfectly delightful period, and May Day of 1898 heralded in the promise of a gracious summer. The French capital was more than ordinarily full of visitors, and life in the world of fashion was like the changeful scenes of a ballet divertissement. Americans were there 'from Chicago and New York, spending millions made in packing pork', Russian notabilities abounded, and Germans, the male element vastly predominating, were in ...
Read More

1897, Anonymous , The Back Door 

Anonymous (1897) The Back Door Serialised in The China Mail  30 September - 8 October 1897  (Note: other sources give it as 9-16th October) The Back Door was an anonymous work of invasion literature serialised in Hong Kong newspaper The China Mail from 30 September through 8 October 1897. The work, written in the form of a historical account, describes an imagined Russian and French landing at Hong Kong's Deep Water Bay, followed by shelling of Victoria Peak, a sea battle in the Sulphur Channel between Hong Kong Island and Green Island, and a last stand at Stonecutters Island in ...
Read More

1897, Gleig, C. , When All Men Starve 

Charles Gleig (1897) When All Men Starve - Showing How England Hazarded Her Naval Supremacy, And the Horrors Which Followed the Interruption of Her Food Supply, London & New York, John Lane The Boer War escalates into an Anglo-German war which is then joined by France and Russia. The French journals especially indulged in most bitter invective against England, declaiming violently against our aggressive policy in Africa and the injustice of our quarrel with the Transvaal. The note of hostility found echo in the reptile press of St. Petersburg, and once more the old Egyptian grievance was exhumed, and furnished ...
Read More

1897, Griffith, G. , Briton or Boer? 

George Griffith (1897) Briton or Boer? A Tale of the Fight for Africa, F.W. White, London Full text at: http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.hnnq4v ...
Read More

1897, Mackay, K. , The yellow wave 

Kenneth Mackay (1897) The yellow wave : a romance of the Asiatic invasion of Australia, London, Richard Bentley & Son In 1885, while at Mittagong, Mackay raised a volunteer cavalry troop called the West Camden Light Horse and was appointed captain in command. Shortly afterwards he returned to the family property to assist his ageing father. He spent his quieter moments writing short stories and ballads. Several were published in newspapers and popular journals before his first book, Stirrup Jingles (1887). Similar publications in Sydney, A Bush Idyll (1888) and Songs of a Sunlit Land (1908), followed. He also wrote ...
Read More

1897, Palmer, J.H. , The Invasion of New York 

John Henry Palmer (1897) The Invasion of New York: Or How Hawaii was Annexed Dated 4 July 1897, Palmer's book is primarily an intervention in the Congressional debate, then in progress, over the annexation of Hawai'i. Palmer backs a policy of aggressive imperial expansion, seeing possession of Hawai'i as a key element in an incipient struggle with Japan for control of the Pacific. His distinction is to be among the first to identify the Japanese as a major imperial competitor, as his novel narrates a surprise takeover of Hawai'i by the Japanese, followed by their invasion of San Francisco. [John ...
Read More

1898, Hampson, J.N. , Great Britain vs. France and Russia 

J. N. Hampson (1898) Great Britain vs. France and Russia. National Review, Vol. 31, June 1898, London, Allen & Co. An award wining essay sponsored by the National Review and the Navy League to identify Britain's weaknesses in the case of war. THE student of history can hardly fail to be struck by a certain resemblance between the general political situation at the time of the outbreak of the late war with France and Russia, and that which obtained in 1778 when, during the American War of Independence, France made war against England, and was in the following year joined ...
Read More