Literary & Cultural Context

Trotter, D. (1993) The English Novel in History 1895 – 1920

David Trotter (1993) The English Novel in History 1895 - 1920, London, Routledge While covering a much wider spectrum than just invasion-scare fiction Trotter's book provides an interesting context of literature and society within which the invasion-scare/future war genre sits. He especially covers the growth of spy fiction in the period 1900-1914. Written specifically for students, David Trotter's The English Novel History 1895—1920 provides the first detailed and fully comprehensive analysis of early twentieth-century English fiction. Trotter examines the whole spectrum of fiction, from the innovations of Joyce's Ulysses through to mass-market genres such as detective stories and spy-thrillers. He ...
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MacKenzie, J. (ed) (1986) Imperialism and Popular Culture

John MacKenzie (ed) (1986) Imperialism and Popular Culture, Manchester University Press Whilst not specific to invasion literature this book contains a series of papers related to the portrayal of empire in popular culture includeing art and music-hall. In particular, it includes a paper discussing juvenile fiction by J.S. Bratton: 'Of England, Home, and duty: the image of England in Victorian and Edwardian juvenile fiction'. It also complements MacKenzie's own work as published in Propaganda and Empire. This book examines the role of popular culture in reflecting and disseminating the nationalist and imperialist ideas dominant In the late Victorian and Edwardian ...
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MacKenzie, J. (1984) Propaganda and Empire

John MacKenzie (1984) Propaganda and Empire - The Manipulation of British Public Opinion, 1880-1960, Manchester University Press Like Imperialism and Popular Culture, this work by MacKenzie covers a wider gamut of public opinion than just invasion literature but it does provide a backdrop against which the reaction to invasion scare stories can be assessed. In particular it includes a chapter on the propaganda aspects of juvenile literature. It has been said that the British Empire, on which the sun never set, meant little to the man in the street. Apart from the jingoist eruptions at the death of Gordon or ...
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Kennedy, P. (1980) The Rise of Anglo-German Antagonism

Paul Kennedy (1980) The Rise of Anglo-German Antagonism, London, George Allen & Unwin (publishers) Ltd. The growing rivalry between Great Britain and Germany before the First World War has long been regarded by historians as one of the major events of that era. For the first time the masses of archival material and private papers available in both Britain and Germany have been used to produce a full-scale, up-to-date analysis. The result reaches far beyond a narrative of diplomatic relations between the two countries. It concerns itself with a thorough comparison of the two societies, their political cultures, economies, party ...
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The Airship Scare of 1909

There was a rash of scares reported in the press during 1909. This has been documented by: Alfred M. Gollin, 'England Is No Longer an Island: The Phantom Airship Scare of 1909', Albion: A Quarterly Journal Concerned with British Studies, Vol. 13, No. 1 (Spring, 1981), pp. 43-57 [Jstor] David Clarke in an article 'Scareships over Britain - The Airship Wave of 1909', Fortean Studies 6 (1999), pp.39-63 and by Brett Holman (2009) in his blog on Airminded ...
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Spy Fever: The Post Office Affair

Margaret Tait Flaws, Spy Fever: The Post Office Affair, Shetland Times Ltd (14 Mar. 2009) At the beginning of the First World War, stories of spies abounded throughout the British Isles. It was in this atmosphere that the entire staff of the Lerwick Post Office was marched off to prison and incarcerated for almost a week with no explanation from the authorities. One of those imprisoned was Margaret Flaws' grandfather and for the last few years the author has been researching the events which led up to the incident. Combining this research with details of how the event affected individual ...
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Coverage in Current Media

Apart from occasional references to The Riddle of the Sands there is generally very little written today about the Invasion Literature of the late 19C / Early 20C. One exception was an article in the Sunday Express on 18th May 2014 as part of its World War One Centenary coverage. The print edition title was 'The Germans are Coming! How fiction prepared us for the Great War' although the online article is headed; 'The pen is mightier than the sword: How fiction prepared us for the Great War'. It can be read at: http://www.express.co.uk/news/world-war-1/126441/The-pen-is-mightier-than-the-sword-Howfiction-prepared-us-for-the-Great-War ...
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Samuel Hynes, (1969) Edwardian Turn of Mind: First World War and English Culture (1969)

The Edwardian Turn of Mind brilliantly evokes the cultural temper of an age. The years between the death of Queen Victoria and the outbreak of the First World War witnessed a turbulent and dramatic struggle between the old and the new. Samuel Hynes considers the principal areas of conflict - politics, science, the arts and the relations between men and women - and fills them with a wide-ranging cast of characters: Tories, Liberals and Socialists, artists and reformers, psychoanalysts and psychic researchers, sexologists, suffragettes and censors. His book is a portrait of a tumultuous time - out of which contemporary ...
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Ramsden, John, Don’t Mention the War

John Ramsden (2006), Don't Mention the War - The British and the Germans since 1890, London, Little, Brown While this book covers attitudes towards Germany and the Germans from 1890 through the 20C it has a chapter that focuses on the period prior to the First World War that discusses the impact on Invasion and Spy Literature upon public opinion and upon official policy. The Times decided in 1891 that 'Germany does not excite in any class among us the slightest feeling of distrust or antipathy' - the zenith of a century in which Britons admired German culture and our ...
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