History of Espionage

Andrew, C. (2009) The Defence of the Realm: The Authorized History of MI5

Christopher Andrew, (2009) The Defence of the Realm: The Authorized History of MI5. Allen Lane Contains an extensive background to the founding of MI5 / SIS and the role of spy and invasion literature. To mark the centenary of its foundation, the British Security Service, MI5, has opened its archives to an independent historian. The Defence of the Realm, the book which results, is an unprecedented publication. It reveals the precise role of the Service in twentieth-century British history, from its foundation by Captain Kell of the British Army in October 1909 to root out 'the spies of the Kaiser' ...
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Jeffery, K. (2010) MI6

Jeffery, K. (2010) MI6: The history of the Secret Intelligence Service 1909 -1949 This book, together with Smith's The Spying Game, describe the historical background to Britain's secret intelligence services and briefly describe the influence of the novels of William Le Queux and of public opinion resulting from the 'spy fever' that gripped Britain at the time. The most detailed and authoritative history of the first forty years of the Secret Intelligence Service, MI6, has been published by the London publishers, Bloomsbury and in the USA by Penguin. Sir John Scarlett, the then Chief of SIS, set the project in ...
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Knightley, P. (2003) The Second Oldest Profession – Spies and Spying in the Twentieth Century

The Second Oldest Profession – Spies and Spying in the Twentieth Century by Phillip Knightley (2003) The first chapter of The Second Oldest Profession – Spies and Spying in the Twentieth Century by Phillip Knightley (2003, 2nd Edition, London, Vintage) contains a description of the interaction between spy fiction (particularly that of Le Queux) and the setting up of MI5 & SIS (MI6). The Second Oldest Profession: The Spy as Bureaucrat, Patriot, Fantasist and Whore, Andre Deutsch (London) and as The Second Oldest Profession: Spies and Spying in the Twentieth Century, W. W. Norton (New York) is a comprehensive and ...
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Morton, J. (2010) Spies of the First World War – Under Cover for King and Kaiser

James Morton (2010) Spies of the First World War - Under Cover for King and Kaiser, Kew, The National Archives When Colonel James Edmonds argued for a British secret service in 1907, officials mocked that he had ̀espionage on the brain'. But fracturing European relations and the resulting explosion in spy activity were to prove Edmonds' prescience. By the time of the First World War undercover agents operated in cities from Geneva to Paris, New York to Moscow, and German spies were being shot in the Tower of London. Spies of the First World War balances accessible history of a ...
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Smith, M. (2003) The Spying Game

Smith, M. (2003) The Spying Game - The History of the Secret Intelligence Service This book, together with Jeffery's MI6, describe the historical background to Britain's secret intelligence services and briefly describe the influence of the novels of William Le Queux and of public opinion resulting from the 'spy fever' that gripped Britain at the time. In The Spying Game - a completely revised and updated version of New Cloak, Old Dagger, described by Christopher Andrew as 'The best up-to-date survey of British intelligence' - he traces the history of British spying from the creation of the modern Secret Service ...
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Spy Fever: The Post Office Affair

Margaret Tait Flaws, Spy Fever: The Post Office Affair, Shetland Times Ltd (14 Mar. 2009) At the beginning of the First World War, stories of spies abounded throughout the British Isles. It was in this atmosphere that the entire staff of the Lerwick Post Office was marched off to prison and incarcerated for almost a week with no explanation from the authorities. One of those imprisoned was Margaret Flaws' grandfather and for the last few years the author has been researching the events which led up to the incident. Combining this research with details of how the event affected individual ...
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Stafford, D. (2013), The Silent Game: The Real World of Imaginary Spies

Stafford, D. (2013) The Silent Game: The Real World of Imaginary Spies, Thistle Publishing The Silent Game traces the history of spy writers and their fiction from creator William Le Queux, of the Edwardian age, to John le Carré, of the Cold War era. David Stafford reveals the connections between fact and fiction as seen in the lives of writers with experience in intelligence, including John Buchan, Compton Mackenzie, Somerset Maugham, Ian Fleming, and Graham Greene. Le Queux used his spy fiction as xenophobic propaganda before and after World War I, and le Carré’s novels have provided reflections on the ...
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Wade, S. (2007) Spies in the Empire: Victorian Military Intelligence

Stephen Wade (2007) Spies in the Empire: Victorian Military Intelligence, Anthem Press There have been a great many books written on military intelligence and the secret services rooted in the twentieth century; however there is very little covering the activities of the men involved in the establishment of this fascinating institution. Its origins lie in the British Army: from the beginnings in the Topographical Department to the Boer War, when various factors made the foundation work of the eventual MI5 (founded in 1909) possible. Incredibly, there were two vast armies in the 1840s, both serving the state and Queen, yet ...
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