Contemporary Publications

Baden-Powell, R. (1915) My Adventures as a Spy

Sir Robert Baden-Powell (1915) My Adventures as a Spy, London, C. Arthur Pearson Ltd In this entertaining little volume of reminiscences Sir Robert Baden-Powell joyfully accepts the title of spy, and he thus does something to remove the absurd discredit attaching to a title which is too loosely used. The process of finding out information about the enemy while one is dressed in civil clothes is called "spying"; the exactly similar process when one is dressed in uniform is called "reconnoitring" or "scouting." By all logic the two processes are equally honourable. In fact the spy accepts the greater risks, ...
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Bernhardi, F. von (1911) Germany and the Next War

General Friedrich von Bernhardi (1911) Deutschland und der Nächste Krieg. [Germany and the Next War, translated by Allen H. Powless - 1912] Friedrich Adolf Julius von Bernhardi (November 22, 1849 – December 11, 1930) was a Prussian general and military historian. He was one of the best-selling authors prior to World War I. A militarist, he is perhaps best known for his bellicose book Deutschland und der Nächste Krieg (Germany and the Next War), printed in 1911. He advocated a policy of ruthless aggression and complete disregard of treaties and regarded war as a "divine business". [Wikipedia] General Friedrich von ...
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Blyth, J. (1909) The Swoop of the Vulture – Contemporary Review

James Blyth (1909) The Swoop of the Vulture,  London: Digby, Long, and Company. Review from New ZealandEvening Post, Volume LXXVII, Issue 150, 26 June 1909, Page 19 A DREAM OF INVASION. "The Swoop of the Vulture." By James Blyth. London: Digby, Long, and Company. Now and then one meets with a literary work which brings the reader face to face with the question: Is it possible to estimate this production solely as a work of art? And when the question is faced — and it is a question that extends beyond literature into every department of human activity— the answer ...
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Blyth, J. (1912) The Peril of Pine’s Place – Contemporary Review

'The Peril of Pine's Place'.The Academy and literature, 1910-1914; Jan 27, 1912; p.112 The Peril of Pine's Place. By JAMES BLYTH. (F. V. White and Co. 6s.) THERE are two young men just down from college, two girls with whom the young men fall in love without hesitation, a rather ill-defined lady villain, and a great detective, who becomes rather commonplace on close acquaintance; there arc also a dozen or so of minor characters. This for the personal side. Then there is a Socialist plot to bring about, a revolution in England, an unnamed but easily recognisable foreign Power in ...
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Burnaby, F. (1876) A Ride to Khiva

Fred Burnaby (1876) A Ride to Khiva It is 1875, the time of the 'Great Game', when the British and Russian Empires are vying for power in central Asia. A British officer rides for Khiva, a Russian city closed to European travellers. He is on a dangerous mission, to learn if Russia plans to invade India, the 'jewel in the crown' of the British Empire. It might be the plot of a Rudyard Kipling novel; instead it is the true story of Captain Frederick Burnaby (1842–85). Burnaby joined the British army in 1859, but in periods without active duty he ...
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Burnaby, F. (1877) On Horseback through Asia Minor

Frederick Burnaby (1877) On Horseback through Asia Minor, London; Sampson Low and Co A follow-up to A Ride to Khiva. “On Horseback Through Asia Minor” details how the brave Burnaby set off in the winter of 1876, convinced he could once again outwit the Czar’s secret police. This time Burnaby determined to ride 2,000 miles across Asia Minor undetected. Ostensibly he was going to observe the Turks away from European influences. However Burnaby needed only the barest of excuses in order to undertake one of the nineteenth century's most courageous equestrian journeys. This book, which was published upon his return ...
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Conan Doyle, A. (1913) Great Britain and the Next War

Arthur Conan Doyle (1913) Great Britain and the Next War - published in Fortnightly Review, February 1913. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was one of the few major authors of the time who clearly foresaw the impending dangers. Now known mainly for his Sherlock Holmes stories, he was also an expert in military affairs, bluff, and outspoken in his criticism of the government. Ever since the Boer War he had been warning his countrymen about the inadequacies of the armed services. In 1912, he wrote an article called "Great Britain and the Next War," a response to General Friedrich von Bernhardi's ...
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Graves, A.K. (1914) The Secrets of the German War Office – Contemporary Review

GERMAN "SPY"; Are Dr. A.K. Graves's Revelations Genuine? - New York Times, December 13, 1914, Review of Books Are "The Secrets of the German War Office," by Dr. Armgaard Karl Graves, genuine revelations, or are they dangerous fiction and a hoax? The author claims to have served the War Office as a spy for ten years, and to have been a central figure in some of the most important political events of those years ...
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Life imitating Art: ‘Spies’ arrested by the Germans

A series of arrests of yachtsmen occurred during the period 1910-1912: ...
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Lowe, C. (1910) About German Spies

Charles Lowe (1910) About German Spies - Contemporary Review, January 1910, pp.46-47 Journalist Charles Lowe wrote in 1910: "Among all the causes contributing to the continuance of a state of bad blood between England and Germany perhaps the most potent is the baneful industry of those unscrupulous writers who are forever asserting that the Germans are only awaiting a fitting opportunity to attack us in our island home and burst us up." [Wikipedia] In order to combat this fear, many denied that there was any cause for concern. For example, journalist Charles Lowe examined the evidence used to justify fears ...
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