Aerial Warfare

1883, Robida, A. , La Guerre au Vingtième Siècle 

Albert Robida (1883) La Guerre au Vingtième Siècle A fantastical view of warfare in the 20C from the French illustrator Robida involving aircraft, tanks, chemical and biological weapons. Robida is said to have shown a penchant for satire even in his youth; by 1873, he had founded his own satirical journal, La Caricature. A decade later, he published the first of a trilogy of satirical, futuristic novels, The Twentieth Century (Le Vingtieme siecle), which portrayed everyday life in 1950s France. That book would be followed in 1887 by War in the Twentieth Century (La Guerre au Vingtieme siecle), and in ...
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1886, Verne, J. , Robur the Conqueror 

Jules Verne (1886) Robur the Conqueror [Robur-le-Conquérant] [aka. The Clipper of the Clouds] Although somewhat outside the scope of Invasion / Future War Literature the subject matter is highly relevant as a science-fiction writer's view on future warfare technology. It was followed by a sequel Master of the World (Maître du monde) in 1904. Summary [Wikipedia]: The story begins with strange lights and sounds, including blaring trumpet music, reported in the skies all over the world. The events are capped by the mysterious appearance of black flags with gold suns atop tall historic landmarks such as the Statue of Liberty ...
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1889, Danrit, E. , La Guerre en Ballon 

Danrit, E. (1889) La Guerre en Ballon The third book in Danrit's trilogy La Guerre de demain. Full text (in French) at: http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.$b598073;view=thumb;seq=1 ...
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1893, Fawcett, E. D. , Hartmann The Anarchist 

E. Douglas Fawcett (1893) Hartmann The Anarchist, London, Edward Arnold. Illustrated by F.T. Jane. The plot centers around Mr Stanley, a young moneyed gentleman who aims to stand for election as part of the Labour party in the early 20th century. Through his associations with many of London's most prominent socialists and anarchists, he encounters and befriends Rudolph Hartmann and 'goes along' with Hartmann's plan to attack London using his airship The Attila. [Wikipedia] Hartmann the Anarchist, originally published in 1892, was written by Edward Douglas Fawcett when he was 17 years old. After being out of print for 100 ...
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1893, Griffith, G. , The Angel of the Revolution 

George Griffith (1893) The Angel of the Revolution: A Tale of the Coming Terror, London, Tower Publishing Company The Angel of the Revolution: A Tale of the Coming Terror (1893) is a science fiction novel by English writer George Griffith. It was his first published novel and remains his most famous work. It was first published in Pearson's Weekly and was prompted by the success of The Great War of 1892 in Black and White magazine, which was itself inspired by The Battle of Dorking. A lurid mix of Jules Verne's futuristic air warfare fantasies, the utopian visions of News ...
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1894, Griffith, G. , Olga Romanoff / The Syren of the Skies 

George Griffith (1894) Olga Romanoff / The Syren of the Skies first published as Pearson's Weekly. The novel continues (from The Angel of the Revolution) the tale of a worldwide brotherhood of anarchists fighting the world armed with fantastical airships, ending on an apocalyptic note as a comet smashes into the earth. Full text at: http://www.forgottenfutures.com/game/ff7/olga.htm ...
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1895, Ellis, T.M. , Zalma 

T. Mullet Ellis (1895) Zalma The eponymous female villain in Zalma (1895) by T Mullett Ellis seeks to continue her father’s efforts to destroy the nobility of Europe and plans to release balloons laden with anthrax over the capital cities, but is thankfully thwarted before she can carry out her plan. [Mike Ashley, The Fear of Invasion, British Library, http://www.bl.uk/romantics-and-victorians/articles/the-fear-of-invasion] Following quickly on the heels of Olga Romanoff, and overtly referencing The Angel of the Revolution, was T. Mullett Ellis' Zalma (1895), in which Zalma von der Pahlen, daughter of the leader of the international nihilist and anarchist movements and, ...
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1895, Griffith, G. , The Outlaws of the Air 

George Griffith (1895) The Outlaws of the Air, London, Tower Publishing   [Serialised in Short Stories in September 1894 - May 1895] With that he sent the Vengeur across the Embankment and the Strand, and placed her over the Law Courts. Then bomb after bomb crashed in quick succession through different parts of the gabled roof of the great building, until it was on fire in a dozen places at once, and there was such a stampede and haste to get out as the law's delay had never known before. That afternoon and evening neither flag was hoisted nor light kindled ...
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1898, Waterloo, S. , Armageddon 

Stanley Waterloo (1898) Armageddon In the utopia and future war story Armageddon, the United States and its ally, the United Kingdom, are fighting a joint Russian—Southern European alliance over trade routes in the Pacific. As war clouds gather, the American scientist-inventor David Appleton volunteers his bomber dirigible, the Wild Goose, to the American-Anglo cause. In a great sea battle, Appleton uses the Wild Goose to drop a bomb on the Russians' lead ship. The ship is pulverized instantaneously. This act, which brings the conflict to an immediate end, changes forever the nature of relations among nations. Accepting their military superiority ...
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1900, Duluth Evening Herald, Aerial Combat

Duluth Evening Herald - 20 November 1900 ...
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1904, Verne, J. , Master of the World 

Jules Verne (1904) Master of the World [Maître du monde]. A sequel to Robur the Conqueror. As a fantastical novel rather than a prediction of future war it, like Robur the Conqueror, is somewhat out of scope of this site but is included for completeness and comparison. Summary [Wikipedia]: A series of unexplained happenings occur across the eastern United States, caused by objects moving with such great speed that they are nearly invisible. The first-person narrator John Strock, 'Head inspector in the federal police department' in Washington, DC, travels to the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina to investigate and ...
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1907, Martin, R.E. , Berlin-Bagdad; Das deutsche Weltreich im Zeitalter der Luftschiffahrt, 1910-1931 

Rudolf Martin (1907) Berlin-Bagdad; Das deutsche Weltreich im Zeitalter der Luftschiffahrt, 1910-1931 Rudolf Martin's science-fiction extravaganza Berlin—Baghdad (1907) visualized 'The German World Empire in the Age of Airship Travel, 1910—1931' but here the principal conflict is between Germany and a post- revolutionary Russia. An ultimatum to England — prior to the complete unification of Europe under German leadership — comes as something of an afterthought and is soon forgotten when the Russians launch an air attack on India. [Niall Ferguson (1999) The Pity of War] Fiction writers, describing similar attacks, embellished them with concrete details and spectacular—even lurid—descriptions of the ...
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