Wilson, H.A. & White, A. (1898) When War breaks out

1024px-1901_Eastern_Telegraph_cablesH.W. Wilson and A. White (1898), When War breaks out; being a selection from the letters of Andrew D. Jones, the London correspondent of “Calner’s weekly,” during the war between Great Britain and the allied powers of France and Russia, September 21st, 1900, to January 1st, 1901, London, Harper and Brothers

[Book Review – Spectator 21st May 1898] When War Breaks Out. By H. W. Wilson and Arnold White. London: Harper and Brothers. The book which bears the above title consists of a series of ” newsy ” letters from the London correspondent of Calner’s Weekly, New York, written during the war between Great Britain and the Allied Powers of France and Russia, September 21st, 1900, to January 1st, 1901. The letters are cleverly done, the authors having caught the American news- paper style to a nicety. They begin by the announcement that on September 20th all the telegraph cables connecting England with the Continent have been cut. On the 21st war is declared, and the Channel Fleet leaves Portland for Gibraltar. On the 23rd the French cruiser Dupuy de Lome’ lands a party on Valencia Island, cuts the shore ends of the Atlantic cables, and destroys the telegraph station and instruments. England is thus telegraphically isolated from the rest of the world.  [Full review at: http://archive.spectator.co.uk/article/21st-may-1898/20/when-war-breaks-out]

The following week the Spectator carried a letter from one of the authors answering some of the criticisms of the Spectator’s review, including:

As to convoy, it is our deliberate belief that we have not the supply of cruisers required. The watching of the hostile fleets will absorb all, or very nearly all, our great warships. As in 1778-1783, we shall be compelled to uncover our trade in order to strike deadly blows at the enemy’s forces. May we add that the forecast as to the economic conditions of the struggle has been based, not upon conjecture, but upon careful sifting of the evidence of experts in every branch. [Spectator 28th May 1989]